Bee propolis a powerful natural antibiotic

Propolis or bee glue is a resinous mixture that honey bees collect from tree buds, sap flows, or other botanical sources. It is used as a sealant for unwanted open spaces in the hive. Propolis is used for small gaps (approximately 6 millimeters (0.24 in) or less), while larger spaces are usually filled with beeswax. Its color varies depending on its botanical source, the most common being dark brown. Propolis is sticky at and above room temperature, 20 °C (68 °F). At lower temperatures, it becomes hard and very brittle

 

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For centuries, beekeepers assumed that bees sealed the beehive with propolis to protect the colony from the elements, such as rain and cold winter drafts. However, 20th-century research has revealed that bees not only survive, but also thrive, with increased ventilation during the winter months throughout most temperate regions of the world.

Propolis is now believed to:

  1. reinforce the structural stability of the hive;
  2. reduce vibration;
  3. make the hive more defensible by sealing alternative entrances;
  4. prevent diseases and parasites from entering the hive, and to inhibit fungal and bacterial growth;
  5. prevent putrefaction within the hive. Bees usually carry waste out of and away from the hive. However, if a small lizard or mouse, for example, finds its way into the hive and dies there, bees may be unable to carry it out through the hive entrance. In that case, they would attempt instead to seal the carcass in propolis, essentially mummifying it and making it odorless and harmless.

Propolis has been used in traditional medicines for thousands of years.

The National Institutes of Health rates propolis as “possibly effective” for treating cold sores, genital herpes, and post-surgery mouth pain. Currently, there is “insufficient evidence” to rate the effectiveness of propolis in treating other conditions.

Antimicrobial

Preliminary scientific studies show some types of propolis have in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity with active constituents including flavonoids like galangin and hydroxycinnamic acids like caffeic acid. In the absence of any in vivo or clinical studies however, it is not clear if this antimicrobial activity has any therapeutic relevance.

Burns

Preliminary in vivo studies with rats suggest propolis may be effective in treating the inflammatory component of skin burns. Also, a clinical trial has shown Brazilian propolis skin cream to be superior to silver sulfadiazine for the treatment of partial thickness burn wounds.Recent studies have raised concerns about the efficacy of silver sulfadiazine, however, and suggest that it may actually delay wound healing. Further clinical research is needed.

Immunomodulation

Propolis has been reported to exhibit both immunosuppressive and immunostimulant effects.Further research is needed to establish if there is a practical application for these seemingly opposing pharmacological effects.

Allergies

Though claims have been made for the use of propolis in treating allergies, propolis can itself cause severe allergic reactions if the user is sensitive to bees or bee products.

Oral hygiene

Propolis has been the subject of recent dentistry research, and there is some in vivo and clinical evidence that propolis might protect against dental caries and other forms of oral disease, due to its antimicrobial properties. Propolis is also being investigated for its efficacy in the treatment of canker sores and in reducing the inflammation associated with canal debridement and endodontic procedures.

Antioxidant

One in vivo study has shown that propolis reduced the chances of cataracts in rat pups. Again however, in the absence of any clinical studies, it is not clear if this activity has any therapeutic relevance.

Cancer

In in vitro tests, propolis induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and reduces expression of growth and transcription factors, including NF-κB. Notably, caffeic acid phenethyl ester down-regulates the mdr-1 gene, considered responsible for the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. In in vivo studies with mice, propolis inhibits 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone-induced tumorigenesis. Once again, in the absence of any clinical studies, it is not clear if this activity has any therapeutic relevance.

 

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